Edupunk Manifesto

  • Classes are conversations.
  • Relationships are dynamic and dynamic is relational

  • Be hypertextual and multilinear, heterogeneous and heterodox

  • Edupunk is not about what happens in the classroom, it is about the world inside the classroom

  • Live your adventure…create your own road as you walk

  • Be a mediator and not a knowledge “measurer”

  • Rack your brain to create new roles in your class, once you have created them, rack their brains too

  • The roles must be emergent, versatile, invisible

  • Take change on board, it is just a matter of attitude (“it’s”)

  • Think of yourself as part of a collective work

  • Do not act as if you were a TV, implicate the people who surround you

  • Disseminate your message, make the walls around you explode

  • Mix, crib, take ownership, pry, play, transform yourself, take action, deviate

  • To hell with the real/virtual antagonism

  • Education that lacks collaboration is fiction

  • Play a part in your arena, investigate through action

  • Do it yourself…but also, and essentially, do it with other people

  • Act Edupunk, destroy these rules, make your own and then, destroy them as well.”

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Why do people really play games?

… and what are the implications for gamification? Bartle suggest that there are four player types

• Achievers (Achiever) aim to solve challenges successfully and get a reward

• Explorers (Explorers) want to discover and learn any thing new or unknown system

• Socializers (Social) are attracted to the social aspects

• Killers (Ambitious): seeking to compete with other players.

… and that only ‘Killers’ actually play purely to win. Succintly put (I hope), a leaderboard and a virtual currency are not the main keys to successful gamification. Most people, about 70%, play for social reasons, rather than achievement and reward.

List of technical terms editors and teachers need to understand

3G

4G

ActiveX

Adobe Air

ADSL

Analytics

API

APK

App

Appx

Avi

Big data

Bitrate

Blog

Bluetooth

Browser

Cache

CD

CDROM

Cloud computing

Cloud hosting

Cookie

Copyleft

CSS

Driver

DRM

DVD

DVDROM

ePub

ePub 3.0

.exe

Extranet

File extensionFirewall

Filesystem

Flash Memory

Flipped classroom

FTP

Geotagging

GNU/GPL

H264

Hadoop

Hardware

HDMI

Hiperlink

HTML

HTML5

HTTP

HTTPS

Intranet

IP

IPA

IWB

Javascript

LAN

Linux

LMS

Markbook

Mkv

MOOC

Moodle

Mp3

Mp4

Mpg

Notebook

Open Source

OS

OSX

PaaS

Peripheral

PIN

Pixel

Platform

Plugin

Port

QR

RAM

Resolution

RIOM

SaaS

SCORM

SFTP

SQL

SSL

Streaming

Tablet

Tablet PC

TinCan

Tracking

URL

USB 2.0/3.0

WAN

Wav

Web Service

WiFi

Wiki

www

XML

The good of small things: Anant Agarwal predicts the campus of the future [from CES 2014]

  • People want information in bite-size chunks. 6 to 8 minutes is the peak length for student engagement
  • But elivering information in smaller chunks isn’t enough. Engaging students with instant feedback and gamification improve the learning process
  • Making learning flexible and allowing students to learn at their own pace is effective
  • If a video is 15 to 40 minutes long, students watch it for maybe two or three minutes

More …

Firefox drops Google | Google no ads

2 interesting little bits of news this week.

1. Firefox have dropped Google as their default engine. The payment by default search engines to occupy pride of place in Firefox is a major source of revenue and it is interesting that Yahoo have beaten Google in the bid. This may be due to two things:

  • Google is enjoying such dominance with Chrome and Firefox use is dropping off. Perhaps Google now feel that they can afford not to have pride of place in a minority browser – well below IE and Chrome in penetration across devices.
  • Mozilla have always said that money as not Nº1. As they are building a competitor OS to Android they may feel this is the time to make the break strategically

2. Google’s no-ad service. This is the very thin end of a very long wedge. It was only matter of time until the clearweb stopped being free and the opportunity to pay the search engine instead of seeing ads offers Google an alternative revenue stream. I feel however, the will have to do better than merely pixellate ads to remove the annoyance factor. I can see a paid version of the web before long. Pay = no ads.

Risks in digital publishing

Some publishers think that once they have cracked the problem of producing digital books in a cost-effective manner (which includes the implementation of a digital-first workflow), they will have transitioned to digital publishing successfully. Their ‘books’ will be media rich and may even be updated on a more or less regular basis and they will be hitting the sweet spot re client requirements

I believe the assumption is wrong and dangerous for the industry and for education. I believe that in a few years, teachers will not want books. They already don’t use them in the UK for example. They will want content, content that can be arranged and rearranged in order to make personalized itineraries, on the fly responding to the needs of different groups and different individuals and situation, paid material will have to seamlessly integrate with UGC and freely-available material.

This is not a technological problem. Technology is already equipped to tag content in many ways, which will ensure many sorts of coherence, depending of teacher methodology. The main problems in cultural. Authors and editors only know how to write and commission ‘book’s. Sales people know how to sell ‘book’s. Linearity is the order of the day.

Ubiquitous computing, social learning, peer learning, etc, while appearing to be on the loony fringe,  are nearer than people think. If the industry ignores these tendencies, they are being complacent and sticking their heads in the sand

Many education publishers today are assuming that buyers of curriculum and other products will recognize the value of products that publishers have poured money into developing, and will be willing to pay more for products the industry produces as it is of higher quality than free.  It’s a shaky assumption, research shows. After not showing any difference in learning outcomes in 2010-2011, the Utah Open Textbook initiative data from 2011-2012 are telling a different story. Those data show a small – but statistically significant – positive effect. Students who used open textbooks as their primary materials during the year performed better on the state’s standardized tests than students who did not.

There has to be an answer [to open-education resources] that goes beyond, ‘our stuff is better than free.’ ”That may mean partnering with others designing materials, and attempt to make money by offering to curate or organize them in ways that would make them more useful to educators.

There are a number of new skills  needed in the industry:

  • Moving away from a purely sequential model of authoring, editing and publishing
    – Realtime publishing

Industrialisation of the digital publishing process
– Combined and not separate digital and print work flow – to the point where this is feasible
– Simply working more quickly

We can draw analogies from the music industry. As Moby remarked, musicians now have to write, promote, score movies, play live and write for other people in order to be successful.

Keeping the traditional print side of the business going, and indeed managing the transition to a less monolithic form of text material in the digital sphere, is going to be costly, all of which mean that innovation in publishing is a long play

Either way, digital textbook suppliers are unprepared for an imminent revolution